Ngangkari News

NT Administrator’s Medal for Excellence in Primary Health Care

Posted on Mar 4, 2016

Since 2012 a team of Indigenous women and mental health professionals have been coming together to uncover words for talking about mental health in Pitjantjatjara, Ngaanyatjarra and Yankunytjatjara. The Uti Kulintjaku team believe that creating a shared understanding of the language used to talk about feelings will improve mental health and emotional literacy, which will lead to increased help-seeking and better communication between Indigenous people and health workers. The innovative work of the Uti Kulintjaku team was recognised with the 2015 NT Administrator’s Medal for excellence in...

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CRANAplus Collaborative Team Award

Posted on Mar 4, 2016

CRANAplus is the peak professional body for the remote and isolated workforce of Australia. Collaborative in nature, bringing Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal health educators together, the Uti Kulintjaku team received the CRANAplus 2015 Collaborative Team...

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Children’s Rights Report 2014 to the Australian Human Rights Commission

Posted on Mar 4, 2016

The National Children’s Commissioner included the Uti Kulintjaku ‘Words for feelings map’ in her Children’s Rights Report 2014 to the Australian Human Rights Commission. The Commissioner writes, “Language barriers can also be problematic for children and young people seeking assistance” (p. 89). She went on to write about the ‘Words for feelings map’ as being “an impressive guide developed to help Aboriginal children and young people talk about mental health” (p. 89). The ‘Words for feelings map’ is featured in full, on p. 90 of this...

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The life of Andy Tjilari

Posted on Feb 24, 2016

The life of Andy Tjilari

  The Life of Andy Tjilari        1925 – 16.5.2015 Kunmanara was born sometime around 1925, at Nyultu, near Kalka, close to where the NT, SA and WA borders meet today. He lived with his father Tommy Urutjakunu Ngunanti, and mother Anawari Tommy, and two older sisters, Makinti Mayaru and Nyinku Adamson. They lived a traditional life in the bush, hunting and walking through their country. Kunmanara often told stories of seeing white people for the first time as a child, explorers on camels and horses, and also flying overhead in an aeroplane, which frightened him so much he slid...

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The Northern Territory Chronic Diseases Network 2014 Recognition Awards

Posted on Sep 12, 2014

The Northern Territory Chronic Diseases Network Recognition Awards 2014 were announced on Wednesday  3rd September 2014. Alice Springs Mayor, Damien Ryan, presented NPY Women’s Council with the award for ‘Conference Theme Category’. This year’s conference theme was ‘Equity at the centre: Action on social determinations of health’. NPY Women’s Council won this award for the achievements of a mental health literacy project: the Uti Kulintjaku project. ‘Uti Kulintjaku’ means ‘to think and understand clearly’ in Pitjantjatjara. The Uti Kulintjaku team includes Senior Anangu Consultants and...

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2013 Deadly Awards

Posted on Oct 7, 2013

2013 Deadly Awards

Latest News – 2013 Deadly Awards At the 2013 Deadly Awards in Sydney on September 10, the NPY Women’s Council Ngangkari Program took out the Published Book of the Year award with their impressive publication Traditional Healers of Central Australia: Ngangkari, published by Magabala Books. NPY Women’s Council ngangkari Pantjiti McKenzie, Maringka Burton, Naomi Kantjuriny and Ilawanti Ken accepted the award at the ceremony in Sydney. Fortunately talented Namatjira actor Derek Lynch from Finke , was on hand to interpret Pantjiti McKenzie’s speech, the only speech of the night to be...

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